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Sunless sea как получить двигатель серпентин

Sunless sea как получить двигатель серпентин

Okay. I give up. How do you get this thing?

I’ve got the Magician, we’ve been to the Tomb Colonies over two dozen times in game and I explore every time. Finally my financial situation in game has gotten so bad that I’m just parked at Venderbright: Explore, Serpent? No. Alt-F4. Repeat. I’ve done this 20 times with the Magician as my engineer.

What am I missing? Or is the event just that rare?

Nope, it does change. At least it did at Port Cecil. I’d just do continuous wine runs there if I could, but I’m constantly getting hit up by that stupid soul smuggler for errands to Polythryeme or Khan’s Heart that cost more than they’re worth.

Sooner or later I’m just going to have to tell him off or steal his money because there’s no way I can afford to keep doing jobs for him.

I got lucky and ran across three life-bergs in a row. The loot from those will keep me afloat for a little bit longer.

I normally never see even one. I assume they’re all out in the darker waters I can’t afford to explore.

I assumed. Everything in this game related to terror is roughly 10 times the reasonable expense. For an officer who can reduce terror at sea, I assumed it would be a further 10x that cost.

It’s a great idea, but the fact that you would literally need to stock your ship in advance to use it. *shakes head*. For how much the magic trick costs, it ought to cut out like 50 or 100 terror. I assume it does 4 or maybe 10.

The event is a lot rarer than it used to be, but it still comes up fairly often (compared to, say, soothe & copper longboxes, which I’ve never seen once from Venderbight)

I’ve seen that one! . y’know. once. *sigh*

I WOULD keep making trips to Venderbright until I got it right, but this lousy soul merchant keeps yanking me to Khan’s Heart.

I’ve seen that one! . y’know. once. *sigh*

I WOULD keep making trips to Venderbright until I got it right, but this lousy soul merchant keeps yanking me to Khan’s Heart.

The Serpentine Engine?

Keep in mind, «better» engines punish you by burning more fuel. There is no real incentive for getting the highest tier engines because of that. You only need to go fast enough. The Serpentine Engine is the best because of its skill bonuses and even more so because of the +10% Fuel Efficiency.

I saw the event. like 2 times. but dodn’t have the Magician yet.

Timmy’s House of Sprinkles

Sunday, February 22, 2015

Okay, Maybe A LITTLE Sun

Each day, I suck a little less at Sunless Sea.

I’m now into my third week of regular play, and have gotten a great handle on survival. I know which beasties to chase down, and when to flick off my lights and flee in the opposite direction. I know what goods to keep in my limited hold space, and what to sell at Wolfstack. I know where the different officers’ plot lines will go, and can prioritize based on my needs.

As a matter of fact, my last game did not end in the watery death of my captain! Granted, I didn’t technically win, either, since it doesn’t officially count as a victory condition, but it still felt like a victory. I got a very striking, and pretty amusing, ending for my captain, heading off into the distance for parts unknown.

One thing I’ve been wrestling with is whether to use the wiki, and to what extent. The information is organized pretty well on there, and it’s generally easy to avoid spoilers if you’re just looking up a few particular things. This can include technical information, like the buying and selling prices of various goods throughout the Unterzee, which can be helpful in planning voyages; but it also provides insight into the mechanical outcomes of several crucial choices that can be made throughout the game, many of which can only occur once.

Early on, I didn’t use the wiki at all. After I had gotten the basics of the game down, I would use it to verify some vague impressions I had («fuel is cheaper in Mount Palmerston than London, right?). Lately, I’ve been using it more liberally, specifically in researching how to unlock different Legacies. I have mixed feelings about that. It does take away from the thrill of discovery; but at the same time, there’s no way I would have ever figured out some of these things on my own. (Not that they’re actually impossible, just that you only get a single shot per game at most things, and I don’t think I’d have the patience to try every permutation, especially after I find a solution that appears to work well.)

So, that will probably come down to each individual player. If you enjoy puzzling things out for yourself, and expect to keep playing Sunless Sea for a while — and particularly if you are fine with the thought of not min-maxing your characters — then you may want to eschew the wiki or restrain yourself to the most basic information.

One thing you don’t need to worry about, though, is plot spoilers. While the wiki gives a lot of mechanical information, it does a great job at avoiding story details about the consequences of your actions. I’m finding myself more and more drawn to this aspect on replays: there are certain things in the game, like being a cannibal, that appear to only provide benefits to your character, but I still try and avoid because I don’t like what it says about me as a person.

So, yeah. I’m still having a ton of fun with the game. Haven’t properly won yet, and I don’t think I’ll officially win my current game, but I’m getting some nice persistent benefits at present and think I’ll have a great shot at victory with my upcoming captain. In no particular order, here’s some more random advice from me after two weeks at zee.

Don’t worry about upgrades

When you first start the game, you’ll be able to visit the shops at Wolfstack and see tons of upgrade options: lamps, engines, ships, ranging from hundreds of echoes to tens of thousands. Like me, you may assume that you’ll be participating in a standard RPG gear cycle: finish quests, kill monsters, get rewards, buy slightly better gear, finish harder quests, kill tougher monsters, get larger rewards, buy even better gear, etc. As I’ve come to learn, though, that really isn’t necessary, or even desirable, so succeed at Sunless Sea.

At a macro level, the game is built around tradeoffs: you can almost never improve one thing without making another thing worse. When it comes to gear, this is most obvious for upgrades like lanterns: more expensive ones give you higher Mirrors, letting you shoot enemies more quickly; but they also lower your Veils, making it easier for enemies to see you. But similar tradeoffs apply to everything. I was really excited when I first bought a new engine, raising my Engine Power from 800 to 1500. But in practice it doesn’t make you go that much faster; and, worse, it burns fuel more quickly than the less-powerful engine. Similarly, buying larger ships can give you much more hold space to ferry goods, a stronger hull to withstand damage, and more equipment slots to place upgrades. But larger ships also weigh more, which means you’ll move more slowly, and require larger crews, which in turn require more supplies to feed, which will end up filling many of those new hold slots.

All that to say: you’re generally fine sticking with your starting tramp steamer for most or the entire game. If you need to buy a bigger ship, you can, but don’t assume it will magically improve every aspect of your game.

As to equipment: the most important thing to upgrade is your deck gun, which should be fairly cheap (200 or 500 echoes), and is a rare upgrade without any negative side-effects. (Note: be aware that some guns require the Forward slot instead of the Deck slot, and won’t fit on your tramp steamer.) This gun will let you take out many of the low-level enemies in a single shot before taking any damage. I also like to get the Whithern Optical, a cheap 100 echo lamp with a good trade-in value that provides a tiny bonus to Mirrors. And for the auxiliary slot, I’m fond of WE ARE CLAY, an upgrade you can purchase in Polythreme that provides a boost to engine power and Iron and lowers crew capacity. That last part might sound like a negative, but it’s actually a good thing: it means that you can travel with as few as 4 crew and still move at full speed, and a full crew complement will consume very few supplies.

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I’m still not completely sure on engines; I think the Serpentine is probably the best, but I have yet to successfully finish the story that grants it, so I’ve been sticking with the Boadicea. It’s the most expensive upgrade I get, and only has a modest increase in speed, but increase seems to be enough to let me outrun certain enemies so it’s worth it for me. I keep vacillating on this, though. it burns so much more fuel, it seems like I might be better off just keeping the starter engine instead.

Think about your choices

Failbetter likes to do something tricky in this game. Occasionally you’ll be faced with a choice that might have, say, three options. Two of those will be standard choices, the third will require a stat check or special resource. As RPG players, we’re pretty conditioned to assume that the third option will always be the best: after all, we went to the work to pump that stat or unlock that item, now we get to reap the rewards!

Well. that’s not always the best outcome. In fact, it’s not at all unusual for it to lead to the worst possible result from the choice. To be fair, though, whenever that happens to me, I feel chagrined by the outcome but also like I deserve it. The text leading up to it, or the larger context of the story, provides good indications of the likely results; I’ve just been fooled by my own autonomic decision-making tendencies burned into me by playing other RPGs.

And, on a related note, don’t be too concerned with failure. A single poor choice will almost never end your game; if it does, Failbetter telegraphs it very clearly. Many times, failing a stat test will provide minimal or no negative repercussions. Take risks, and you may end up better than you expect.

Consider your Legacy

Legacies are crucial to my enjoyment of the game: they keep me from ragequitting after I die and help future voyages end more successfully than earlier ones.

The baseline legacies are the Ironclad Will and the Scion. Both of these require upgrading your lodgings; you don’t need to rush to do that, but once you have the immediate needs of your ship taken care of, you might want to prioritize that.

As you play the game, you’ll occasionally run across Captivating Treasures, often from completing certain quests. These can be sold for money, but I prefer turning them into Heirlooms in my Lodgings. Combined with the Ironclad Will, these will all be passed forward to my next character. Then, when my next character starts, I start by selling one of my Heirlooms. This will raise about 1000 echoes. I immediately purchase a new Ironclad Will for another 100 echoes, and still have enough left over for my essential ship upgrades like a better deck gun. So far I haven’t had to touch any of my remaining heirlooms. As long as I get a couple each game, they gradually accumulate, creating a really nice buffer of wealth for my future characters to tap as needed.

Once you have your Scion, you’ll be able to choose between two legacies. I’ve been picking the Shipmate one, which keeps half of your Hearts and lets you keep an officer; if you’ve upgraded an officer, you’ll get the benefits of their increased stats without needing the time and cost to re-upgrade them. (Note, though, that in some cases you may be missing out on some interim rewards along their questline, so consider in advance whether this is something you want.) For the second, I’ve lately been picking the Rival one, which lets you keep a single weapon. As I’ve discovered, for both this and Shipmate, you can select from any that you have acquired over the course of the game, and not only the ones on the ship with you at the end. In my case, I had acquired a unique and expensive weapon at the end of an officer’s plotline. I can’t even equip this weapon since it’s a Forward one, but it can be traded in for a lot of money and influence, so it’s worth holding on to.

The other compelling legacies are Pupil and Salvager, each of which carry forward 50% of your wealth (so, if you select both, you’ll keep 100% of the money your previous captain had at death). They also maintain your Veils and Mirrors, two of the most useful stats. Those would be solid choices, but if you are able to plan the end of your game in advance (a suicide run, an expected victory), it isn’t really necessary: you can liquidate all of your holdings, buy Captivating Treasures from Khan’s Shadow, install them as Heirlooms in your lodgings, then go to your death with empty pockets but a full estate.

And, finally, there are the special unlockable legacies, each of which will give you +25 to a given stat (meaning you start out at 50 rather than 25). Unlike the Scion legacies, these are cumulative, so you can ultimately get new characters with across-the-board starting stats of 50 (or even higher with Scion legacies). As I alluded to before, these have very particular requirements which are hard to discover in-game. But, they are very worth seeking out.

(It may be worth mentioning that the +25 stat bonus you get from choosing a background isn’t applied if you already have over 50 in a stat, as I noticed to my chagrin in my most recent game. On the bright side, though, that does mean you’ll be encouraged to spread around your stat points somewhat, rather than feeling like you always need to pump one or two particular stats.)

Keep playing!

I may not have «won» yet, but I’m getting better and stronger every day. This really is a gripping, enveloping world on so many levels: the moody atmosphere, the tight gameplay, the strong feeling of stakes and consequences from permadeath. Before too much longer, I expect that I will have crossed over the boundary and joined the ranks of the truly successful zee-captains.

(Final postscript: holy cow, this Dino Comics is absolutely perfect.)

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You’ve been down too long in the Sunless Sea

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Got off to a slightly rocky start, but then I had one good trip that led me around in a pretty solid route to like a dozen ports and now I’m closing in on 2k echoes.

Also realized I had been playing for like four hours before I even noticed.

Well, I am now onto Morgan the 3rd, but I’ve got enough of a grasp on this game that I’m starting to get somewhere with all the myriad questlines and other goals.

Currently my long-term goal is build the greatest engine the zee will ever see, though the task itself seems both impossible and incredible exciting.

Also not spending secrets is a good way to get secrets

50 of any stat is actually not too shabby

Sphinxstone run, said no to the Dawn Machine offer but accepted the second one since I’d done that before and it had just sent me to the far East to deliver it (and paid double). Figured it would be the same this time around and nope: THIS time it’s a delivery in London (woo!) but the requirement for delivery is a Veils score of 75 and I’ve only got a 63.

So . . . I mean, there’s no other place to unload it, right? No other sale point? Until I somehow get another 12 points in Veils or make enough money to upgrade my ship, I’m working with -20 cargo space? Ugggggggh.

Sphinxstone run, said no to the Dawn Machine offer but accepted the second one since I’d done that before and it had just sent me to the far East to deliver it (and paid double). Figured it would be the same this time around and nope: THIS time it’s a delivery in London (woo!) but the requirement for delivery is a Veils score of 75 and I’ve only got a 63.

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So . . . I mean, there’s no other place to unload it, right? No other sale point? Until I somehow get another 12 points in Veils or make enough money to upgrade my ship, I’m working with -20 cargo space? Ugggggggh.

Sphinxstone run, said no to the Dawn Machine offer but accepted the second one since I’d done that before and it had just sent me to the far East to deliver it (and paid double). Figured it would be the same this time around and nope: THIS time it’s a delivery in London (woo!) but the requirement for delivery is a Veils score of 75 and I’ve only got a 63.

So . . . I mean, there’s no other place to unload it, right? No other sale point? Until I somehow get another 12 points in Veils or make enough money to upgrade my ship, I’m working with -20 cargo space? Ugggggggh.

welp, just got one of those +25 stat boost legacy items

time to start looking for a new surgeon

So I just got one of the quest engines

And I had upgraded directly from the default starting engine

It feels a lot like this is a load of shit? I’m pretty sure I use up twice as much fuel with this thing for only a slight increase in speed

So I just got one of the quest engines

And I had upgraded directly from the default starting engine

It feels a lot like this is a load of shit? I’m pretty sure I use up twice as much fuel with this thing for only a slight increase in speed

So I just got one of the quest engines

And I had upgraded directly from the default starting engine

It feels a lot like this is a load of shit? I’m pretty sure I use up twice as much fuel with this thing for only a slight increase in speed

So I just got one of the quest engines

And I had upgraded directly from the default starting engine

It feels a lot like this is a load of shit? I’m pretty sure I use up twice as much fuel with this thing for only a slight increase in speed

So I just got one of the quest engines

And I had upgraded directly from the default starting engine

It feels a lot like this is a load of shit? I’m pretty sure I use up twice as much fuel with this thing for only a slight increase in speed

So I just got one of the quest engines

And I had upgraded directly from the default starting engine

It feels a lot like this is a load of shit? I’m pretty sure I use up twice as much fuel with this thing for only a slight increase in speed

Ah, I believe that is the Impeller.

I’m slowly working on that, but it seems like a pretty crazy task.

Haha, What in the hell.

A hot surgeon lady just «appeared» on my boat in the middle of my ocean. She gives zero reason as to how she gets there and she wounded me when i had dinner with her. And then I went mad.f

And now i burned down a house.

Ah, I believe that is the Impeller.

I’m slowly working on that, but it seems like a pretty crazy task.

Ah, that’s the one.

It’s a pain, but sooooo worth it.

Ah, I believe that is the Impeller.

I’m slowly working on that, but it seems like a pretty crazy task.

Ah, that’s the one.

It’s a pain, but sooooo worth it.

Yeah I managed to get one part of it with my last captain.

This time I have more starting echoes, though, so I think I should be able to get much further.

Currently doing sunlight runs to try and get the cash for a better boat.

So I just got one of the quest engines

And I had upgraded directly from the default starting engine

It feels a lot like this is a load of shit? I’m pretty sure I use up twice as much fuel with this thing for only a slight increase in speed

Let’s have a run down of the latest misfortunes:

I returned to the Lady of Cages having delivered a small item on her behalf to London, and was rewarded with 20 supplies and 10 casks of wine. I had to toss 17 supplies into the sea. I then interacted with her again and recieved ANOTHER 20 supplies. This was incredibly irritating.

I went 1 step too far into the Shattered Citadel, lost 2 candles in one move and had to grope my way out, leaving me with 4 crew and 90 terror. I made it back to London with 1 crew remaining and having gone completely mad. I may have tossed a sailor overboard at some point. At least I have a townhouse so returning to sanity wasn’t too bad.

I decided to purchase a couple of live specimens for the Navigator’s quest, but instead of doing this what I did was purchase one for 500, and then click in what I thought was the same place again only to sell it back for 125. This was incredibily irritating.

So I just got one of the quest engines

And I had upgraded directly from the default starting engine

It feels a lot like this is a load of shit? I’m pretty sure I use up twice as much fuel with this thing for only a slight increase in speed

Best way to improve speed is to get a ship with an aft slot and buy the Caminus Yards Suppressor so you can always run engines at max. Only engines worth running are the basic one, the 1k one, the Serpentine and the Impeller.

Got all the legacy stuff and the 30k ending, now working on the Fathomking one (and goddamn).

Sunless sea как получить двигатель серпентин


Official Website — Steam page

What is Sunless Sea?
A 2D story-driven exploration game by Failbetter Games, creators of Fallen London and the Storynexus engine. The game is set in the same universe as Fallen London, but instead of being a free to play browser game it’s a full-fledged standalone experience. Playing Fallen London isn’t necessary to enjoy the game, although it helps if you want to have a greater understanding of the setting. The game’s release date is the 6th of February 2015, although there will be post-launch content updates and an expansion allowing you to travel below the waves in a zubmarine.

Gameplay
The gameplay consists of a fusion between a top-down sailing game a story engine, similar to Storynexus with some heavy modifications. You need to manage Terror and Hunger lest you go mad and be forced to turn to cannibalism on the darkness of the Zee. The combat system is a fairly simplistic business; keep your enemies in the arc of your guns to charge up a shot, and then fire when you get the chance. The more you charge, the more likely it is you’ll land a hit. Here’s a short video explaining the whole thing.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VlIENkbQqg

The combat is mostly an interlude, though; the real meat of the game lies in the many islands on the Unterzee. Every port has stories to tell, opportunities for profit and secrets to be uncovered. And there’s rather a lot of story there; more than two hundred thousand words, and it’s still growing.

Most actions in the game rely on five stats; Hearts, Veils, Iron, Pages and Mirrors. They can be raised by hiring new officers, spending items or installing new equipment on your ship such as guns and engines. Each stat governs some facet of gameplay; evasion (Veils), Terror management (Hearts), combat (Iron), Illumination and observation (Mirrors) and knowledge and Secret production (Pages).

The game can be rather unforgiving, especially at first. You will, very probably die several times. Maybe more than several times. But death is not quite the end; you can pass down one thing to your next captain; two, if you managed to successfully start a family. You can preserve 50% of a stat, and each stat brings some other benefit with it. If your Captain wrote a will, you can also pass down upgraded Lodgings and Heirlooms, which can be sold for an initial stat bump. You may also find certain Legacy items, which will improve all of your future captains.

However, the Unterzee shuffles around with the death of each captain unless you choose to preserve your old captain’s chart. Things stay in roughly the same position, though; anything on the coast will stay on the coast, anything on the North border will stay somewhere on the North border, and things tend to stay roughly the same distance away from London, even if their actual positions change somewhat

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Roadmap
The game is almost entirely finished now; some additional content will be added post-launch, and there’s at least one expansion planned for the future. The game is almost entirely completed; but you can still see the roadmap here. The game received a whole lot of content updates during development; these are likely to continue post-launch. The full changelog of those content patches and any more to come is available here.

Why should I buy this game?
If you like reading words, you will probably like this game! Especially if you’re a fan of interactive fiction; several islands have been guest-written by noted IF authors Emily Short and Meg Jayanth.
The game does feature trading mechanics, but it’s not really a game about trading; not the next Patrician or Port Royale, in other words. The game is very much about finding new places, with new experiences and stories to tell; though there is still a trading economy of sorts, it’s not the intended route to fortune.
Seriously, though, the game’s atmosphere and sense of place are incredible. There’s no one overarching plot tying everything together, though; consider it like a collection of interconnected short stories, rather than one entire novel. There is a «main story» route, of sorts, but it’s more about individual stories; the personal stories of your officers and the locational stories of each island, as well as the stories you make for yourself along the way.

Why’s it so hard to make money?
It can be kind of rough starting out, still, I will admit. Whether or not dying a whole bunch at the start is the intended system is debatable, I guess, but there are a lot of ways to make cash now, even early on. Exploration is key, though; if you’re running a trade route over and over again for meagre Echo profits, you’ve probably gone wrong somewhere. Don’t be afraid to take risks! Dying over and over to try and get to grips with the game probably isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, after all. Here are a few tips and guides to help you light the way through the darkness. In no particular order, these things may be helpful;

  • Intelligence gathering and Port Reports are probably the strongest way to get a little bit of starting capital.
  • Stick near the coasts and other landmasses to reduce Terror buildup.
  • At first, your prow light is the biggest devourer of Fuel; turning it off will let you save an awful lot. Try not to let Terror get too high; past 50, you have the chance to get Nightmares when you return to London, past 70 or so you’ll start to encounter hazard events and at 100 you’ll end up with a mutiny on your hands; a game-over, if you don’t pass a stat check. That said, Terror can be mitigated fairly easily now, so don’t be too worried about it.
  • Combat is actually fairly useful as a Terror reducer; even easy creatures like zee-bats and crabs can reduce it by 5 points or so, not to mention any benefits from the dead creature itself.
  • Opening the University should be a high priority; it lets you sell plenty of things to get cash money. It’s not a tremendously good idea to sell Tales of Terror, Zee-Ztories and Memories of Distant Shores, though; they tend to have other uses.
  • Make use of Hunter’s Keep while you can; stopping off there can reduce Terror and Hunger, and get you Supplies and zee-god Attention. Salt’s Attention from Cynthia is pretty useful; you can use it at the Salt Lions to get an Extraordinary Implication.
  • If you can find the Salt Lions, you can deliver a few loads of Sphinxstone to make a lot of easy money. You don’t get that many deliveries; 2-5, depending on your luck, but it’s an extremely good way to start off. You need 200 Echoes to start off, though.
  • The final Sphinxstone delivery gives an extremely large payout, but may be located anywhere from London to Irem. The cash from the deliveries should let you afford to make the trip. If it helps, Adam’s Way is always on the southern coast, and Irem is always in the top right corner; the Chelonate’s position is random, but it’s generally somewhere in the last two columns of the map. If you toss the Sphinxstone overboard, you can pick it up again at the Salt Lions, though you will need to pay up again.
  • The initial quest for dropping off a Tomb-Colonist in Venderbight is a good way to get a small starting bump; but if it seems too difficult or expensive, you can put it off. The important part is picking up the First Curator’s quest; it can give you an awful lot of money in very short order.
  • Finding the Avid Horizon early can be a tremendous boon; it’s always somewhere on the top row, but on some maps it can spawn very far away. Still, if it shows up nearby, you can get a Hunter’s Eye easily for the First Curator. You’re given one «Beginner’s Luck» item cache per game; if you use this at the Avid Horizon, there’s a chance you can find an Eyeless Skull, which the First Curator will also accept. If you luck out, you can make 2000 echoes with very minimal effort.
  • Using Admiralty’s Favour early on to get Fuel is a pretty good idea; it’s hard to cover the expenses at first, and you won’t need it for much later on.
  • If your Admiralty’s Favour is less than 3, you will always be sent to Demeaux Island or the Corsair’s Forest for your first Intelligence-gathering mission.
  • You don’t need to submit Strategic Information from the Admiralty Commissions straight away. It’s generally a good idea to try and get two if you can afford to; you can use them from your Hold to create Vital Intelligence, which is worth more and unlocks Spycraft options.
  • The Merchant Venturer is a pretty great way to get extra money; you can sometimes obtain the items he’s asking for in London, but it’s almost always a better idea to find them elsewhere.
  • Talk to your officers! They all have stories to pursue, and all of them provide rewards, be they rare items, upgrades or just improved versions of the officer.
  • The Genial Magician’s story is a pretty good one to start off with; it’s not terribly long or expensive, and allows you to build the Serpentine engine, which comes with good stat boosts and innate efficiency.
  • Buying new engines is often not a tremendously good idea unless you have a whole lot of money to spend and nowhere to spend it; the increase in speed is fairly marginal, but the increased fuel costs can bite.
  • Several islands have stories that can be completed in one or two trips; Nuncio, Visage, Pigmote Isle and a few others. If you can find them early on, they can provide a powerful capital bump.
  • Also notable is Varchas; it can take three or four trips, but leave you extremely well off by the end. Make sure to sleep in the inn at least once; you’ll get a Terror bump, but you can talk about Dreams of Smoke with the Sun-Priests to get a Mirror Charm afterwards, which the First Curator will want.
  • Sunlight Smuggling is no longer a method to get a million echoes in ten seconds (approximately), but it’s still a pretty potent way of accumulating funds. Take Mirrorcatch Boxes from Khan’s Shadow to the Surface, bring the resulting sunlight to the Blind Bruiser or the Isle of Cats, get paid. Every box increases a menace quality by 4-7; ill effects start to kick in over 100, 140 is pretty hazardous, at 200 you can’t visit the Surface any more. Resting in your lodgings decreases the menace by a little.
  • A little cannibalism goes a long way.

Guides

  • This guide lists some of the best trading routes. Most of them are best pursued as incidental drop-offs between other pursuits, rather than something you actively focus on, but there’s money to be made one way or another.

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